What's the Best Wine Aerator?

Published: 25th June 2010
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Many people, especially those that don't drink wine very often, may not know exactly what a wine aerator is and what exactly it does. Don't be intimidated, drinking wine is supposed to be a joy and not a competition. Wine snobbery detracts from everything wine drinking stands for, so pay no attention to any wine drinker who turns up their nose at your faux paus.



A wine aerator is simply a device that increases the speed at which wine will "open" up and breathe. If you're looking for the very best wine aerator that's custom tailored just for your particular taste and need, there a several different options, brands and price points to consider.



If you're a new wine drinker, for now, it's great to simply know that a wine aerator very quickly increases and enhances the flavor of wine, allowing us to experience wine's fullest flavor without having to wait. As you progress in your knowledge of aerators you'll instinctively see something that you click with.



In the past, before wine aerators, sommeliers and wine connoisseurs were forced to go through the process of decanting. Decanting is simply letting the wine breathe and be exposed to air and oxygen over time. That's exactly what a wine aerator does as well, but, this ingenious device is shaped and designed in such a way as to have loads of air and oxygen permeate the wine within just a few seconds instead of having to wait for much longer periods of time.



There are a few different types and styles of aerators. Some aerators are designed to attach to the bottle of wine and other are designed to attach to a decanter, still others are designed to attach to a decanter or a wine glass. An aerator works by infusing the wine with air as it is poured into either the glass or the carafe. It does this by filtering and separating the wine into smaller streams so that the wine is exposed to as much air as possible.



What this does to the wine is both soften it and bring out the subtle hidden flavors in wines. The effect will differ from wine to wine. Younger wines are softened and the harsh tannins and acidity are mellowed, older wines are brought back to life and the often subtle flavors are brought more to the forefront. The finish of the wine will be decidedly smoother and more refined. In fact, many people believe that a good wine aerator can make very cheap wine taste respectable. Older and more expensive wines are made even better and fuller; this is the way that wine is truly supposed to taste.



The Vinturi brand wine aerator is probably the best known aerator in the United States. It's extremely elegant and attractive, although admittedly somewhat awkward to use and leaky. This is a classy aerator, bullet shaped, glass; it appears a little like a small piece of modern art. This device retails for around $40 dollars and may not be dishwasher safe.



The Soiree wine aerator is slightly cheaper and is supposed to fit onto any wine bottle; however that is not always the case. Although, it does tend to pour without leaking or dripping. The cost is around $25.



The Centellino brand aerator is more expensive and certainly handsomely made; created from hand blown glass, it retails for about $50 dollars. However, this device has been reviewed poorly as inferior by some recent reviewers.



For the best wine aerator, look for one that sits on top of the glass. This design helps create the "one complete breathing system" recommended by wine experts around the world. You don't need to spend on a clumsy, leaky design. Get the results you desire with the right product.





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Finally! The very best wine is only moments away! Red wine aerators simplify the decanting process and provide immediate results. The WineWeaver is specifically designed as "one complete breathing process" and you should taste what a difference it makes for almost any bottle of red or white. Check out how to find the best wine aerator and see how it works !

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